26 photos 13 species


Introduction


They are elongated and have between 110 and 270 vertebrae.

They have no or very small pectoral and caudal fins, which are taken over by the anal and dorsal fins.

Since the tip of the tail of many species is bony, the eels have the ability to drill backwards into the sand very quickly.

Depending on the species, they are between 11 cm and 1.7 m long.


Brachysomophis cirrocheilos

Stargazer snake eel

Maximum length: 16 cm

Depth: 1 - 100 m

This eel lives in sandy and muddy bottoms near coastal reefs.

Whitish body with brown to red spots.

Nocturnal, burying itself up to its head in the sand, where it then catches squid and fish swimming by.

Photo 1 Johnny: Bangka Island North Sulawesi


Brachysomophis crocodilinus

Crocodile snake eel

Maximum length: 125 cm

Depth: 1 - 30 m

It is very rare to see them completely, usually just with their heads sticking out of the sand, lying in wait for crabs and fish.

Photo 1 Johnny: Lembeh - Strait North Sulawesi

  Photo 2 Astrid: Lembeh - Strait North Sulawesi


Callechelys marmorata

Marbled snake eel

Maximum length: 87 cm

Depth: 10 - 30 m

White body with many black dots.

His nostrils point downwards.

Found on outer reefs in sandy zones.

It is usually buried in sand or mud with only its head sticking out.

At night it hunts small fish and crabs based solely on smell.

Photos 1 - 3 Johnny: Hurghada Egypt


Conger cinereus

Longfin african conger

Maximum length: 130 cm

Depth: 10 - 90 m

Mostly found at night, hidden during the day.

Photos 1 - 2 Johnny: Hurghada Egypt


Gorgasia preclara

Splendid garden eel or Orange-barred garden eel

Maximum length: 20 cm

Depth: 10 - 90 m

Native to: Indo-Pacific, America and Florida.

They can be found in coral reefs down to a depth of 25 m. They are active during the day and eat plankton.

Photos 1 - 2 Johnny: Oberhausen Germany ( Aquarium )


Gorgasia sillneri

Red sea garden eel

Maximum length: 95 cm

Depth: 10 - 90 m

The upper body stretches up so that plankton can be caught.

Photos 1 - 2 Johnny: Hurghada Egypt


Heteroconger longissimus

Brown garden eel

Maximum length: 50 cm

Depth: 5 - 70 m

Lives in colonies, with the head and some of the body sticking out of the sand.

Their body is thin and dark brown to gray.

Her lower jaw is protruding.

Move continuously with graceful wave-like movements to prey on plankton.

Very shy, they immediately retreat into their burrow when approached.

Photo 1 Astrid: Bonaire Caribbean

Photo 2 Johnny: Bonaire Caribbean


Heteroconger hassi

Spotted garden eel

Maximum length: 40 cm

Depth: 10 - 90 m

The upper body stretches up so that plankton can be caught.

Photo 1 Johnny: Moalboal Philippines

Photo 2 Johnny: Embudu Maldives


Myrichthys breviceps

Sharptail snake-eel

Maximum length: 105 cm

Depth: 2 - 15 m

Head with small yellow spots, body with large, blurred, pale spots.

The body itself is thin and gray, but can also be olive brown.

This species is found in areas with rocky scree, in reefs and in shallow seagrass meadows.

They can move under the sand.

Usually hidden during the day, foraging at night.

Don't be shy, allow a close approach.

Photo 1 Astrid: Bonaire Caribbean

Photos 2 - 3 Johnny: Bonaire Caribbean


Myrichthys colubrinus

Banded snake eel, Ringed snake eel or Harlequin snake eel

Maximum length: 97 cm

Depth: 1 - 25 m

This species is often seen while snorkeling and is confused with sea snakes because they imitate sea snakes, which have similar banding.

Photo 1 Johnny: Lembeh Strait North Sulawesi


Myrichthys maculosus

Tiger snake eel, Ocellate snake eel or Spotted snake eel

Maximum length: 100 cm

Depth: 1 - 25 m

Whitish with large black dots.

Photos 1 - 4 Johnny: Hurghada Egypt


Ophichthus altipennis

Highfin snake eel

Maximum length: 80 cm

Depth: 0 - 25 m

They are found on sandy bottoms near coral reefs, where they are usually only seen with their heads sticking out of the sand.

Photo 1 Johnny: Lembeh Strait North Sulawesi


Ophichthus bonaparti

Napoleon snake eel

Maximum length: 70 cm

Depth: 1 - 30 m

This beautiful species inhabits sandy bottoms and seagrass meadows; you can usually only see its head sticking out of the sand.

When the animal swims freely, it quickly buries itself tail first in the sand if disturbed.

They don't have a permanent home.

The body is banded black and white and is probably intended to imitate that of sea snakes to provide protection, but the tail is pointed unlike the snakes.

Photo 1 Johnny: Lembeh Strait North Sulawesi